Tag: Wind Lanes

Wind Lanes & Slicks

Wind Lanes & Slicks

 

More and more of us are trying to expand our horizons when it comes to fishing. Rather than sticking to the bank, on small waters, many of us are turning our attentions to larger waters and that means taking to the boats.

At this time of year there’s so much going on, in or near the surface, that we should really pay close attention to this shallow band of water.

On a day with a slight breeze you’ll often see ‘oily’ patches, areas of calm in an otherwise ‘ripply or riplled’ surface. These are often referred to as wind lanes or slicks. Basically, the tension in the water’s surface, in this type of water, is a lot stronger than the rippled water around it and this means that it traps and holds insects. As a result these slicks become a haven for feeding trout.

If you find this type of water when you’re out in a boat, you must give it a try!

It’s often the larger resident trout that capitalise on the easy pickings this type of water offers.

 

Into a good fish in oily water up in Rutland’s Cattle Trough bay area..
Dry fly has a really god habit of sorting out the better fish, like this Pitsford rainbow..

 

Buzzers

You don’t need to use sinking lines to target fish in this type of water; all you’ll need is a floater, as the trout tend to be no more than two feet below the surface.

They will be taking ascending midge pupa as they try to emerge at the surface.

At this stage the buzzers will have distinct orange wing buds so make sure that your patterns have them too. It’s a trigger point that the trout tend to home in on.

There will be trout taking the actual emerging fly too. As the buzzer is trying to emerge through the surface film it is at its most vulnerable. As it struggles to escape it becomes very easy picking for a hungry trout.

 

Buzzers, Midge they make up the majority of the trout’s diet, this is s ginger buzzer form Draycote Water, I chose to fish Ginger Hoppers that evening and they worked a treat!

 

Terrestrials

It’s not just buzzers that the trout will be looking to exploit, there’s the whole gamut of terrestrials insects that fall onto the water too.

These can be things like daddy longlegs, flying ants – if you get a fall of these things on the water then be prepared for some explosive action – beetles and dung flies. In fact anything that belongs on land but ends up on the water’s surface can attract the trout’s attention.

So make sure you have enough patterns in your fly box to cover all eventualities.

 

Most terrestrials are black so have a good selection of various types, heather fly, hawthorn etc, but tie in other colours too, the Dung fly can be a real killer!

 

 

DRY FLY is KING but you need accuracy

If you can see trout feeding on the surface, the tell tale head-and-tail rise will give them away. Then your casts need to be accurate. If the trout are just sipping at the surface then they are high in the water and this means that they’re window of vision is very small indeed.

A tapered leader will help you greatly when it comes to presentation, try fishing a single fly too as this will allow you to drop your fly on the trout’s nose.

 

A Big Red dropped right in it’s feeding path, with the help of a well constructed leader, helped to fool this Grafham Resident.

 

The Washing Line

If there were was one technique that offers more success when fishing in slicks than the dry fly it would have to be the ‘washing line’.

The use of a buoyant fly on the point position, such as a Booby or Muddler, to support two or even three initiative patterns on your droppers, is a deadly way in which to target fish that are near the surface layers.

 

The washing Line can be great for surface feeding fish!

 

When fished on a full floater it gives the leader that ‘parallel with the surface plane’ during the retrieve. The length of your droppers will determine how deep your flies fish, The Booby or more recently the FAB on the point creates an enticing wake that will often see trout single it out.

 

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