Tag: river

5 Essential Fly Lines For Boat Fishing

5 Essential Fly Lines For Boat Fishing

Okay, let’s start at the beginning, this is for guys and girls that fish ‘loch style’ in other words cast out of the front of a drifting boat in order to target trout!

This style of fishing is a pretty big deal here in the UK BUT it’s growing in popularity and as a result more and more anglers from all over the world want to know more about this extremely effective technique.
It’s a complex form of fishing, however the whys and the wherefores of doing it right are for another day!

With this little article I want EVERYONE to know the 5 Essential Fly Lines for Boat Fishing which you must-have here in the UK, and dare I say it the world if you want to stand a decent chance of catching fish the whole year through!

I’m not going to get overly technical, no point, once you get into it you’ll figure it all out yourself!

And also, I can do another article highlighting the other lines you need at some point, right!

Currently, I carry 36ish fly lines when I boat fish, so there’s some food for thought!

 

When you get a touch more serious then the line count goes up, dramatically!

So, let us work from the top of the water down shall we? After all the trout’s eyes are on the top of their head, not on the bottom!

Now remember, BASICS! Oh, before I forget, don’t muck about with presentation tapers go weight forward every time, loads the rod quicker and you’ll cast further, should you need to!

1. Floating Line
This is the best-selling fly line in the world and no wonder as it lets you do an awful lot! This is our go-to choice when it comes to dry flies, wet flies, and slowly fished nymphs and buzzers/midge.
It allows you to keep the flies fishing high in the water, they can be fished slowly too, which is great for a natural presentation.
It is the ideal line for presentation fishing, unless it’s windy and then your line control goes out the window!

2. The Midge-Tip
Okay this may well have other names but the premise is the same, a floating line with the sinking front section – 1 to 2 inches per second and normally 3-feet. This front section sinks like an intermediate line and this allows the angler to bed their flies in under the waters’ surface.
It’s a line which offers a little more depth, it’s surprising just how much depth, as well as control when nymph / buzzer fishing. For this reason it’s one that seen threaded though an awful of UK rods from April through to June when we have the cream of our nymph fishing.
It’s also a great choice for wet fly fishing for wild brown trout!

3. Slime Line
Rather than just highlight an ‘intermediate’ line, I thought I’d pick out this one. ‘Slime line’ is generic now, and a few companies make them, it’s basically a clear intermediate line. It has gained a massive foot-hold in our fly line armoury duo in part to it’s clarity, it has no colour.
It sinks around 1.25 to 2 inches a second and it’s good choice for fishing a foot to three-foot down, it’s great for lures, wet flies again – of course in a big wind, the Irish anglers love it!

It’s not as in your face and as visible as a lot of other intermediate lines which can come in various colours and sinking densities and this makes the slime line an essential fly line for boat fishing!

4. The Di5 Sweep Line
Yes, I’m being very specific, like I said I’m looking at essentials here!
For pulling lures, this line takes some beating
Obviously, this will sink faster than it’s Di3 counterpart and for me therefore I choose the five over the three!
Sweep lines, allow you to cover more water as the belly is heavier than the tip, so this means that your flies are fished in a very enticing, fishing finding arc!
I use this line often for finding the trout’s feeding depth, and either stick with it or move up or down in the water column with other lines  to capitalise.

5. 40+ Di7 Extreme Line
This particular line has a short head and so loads the rod quicker and it also features a skinny running line, so that when you cast, if you’re any good, the line goes miles!
It’s this distance that will see me pick this line over other fast sinkers.
If I’m in a boat and paired up with someone, as is usually the case in competitions, I want to cover water before they do, in order to do that I have to cast further!
This is crucial early season when drifting onto banks, get your flies in the area first and you get the fish first, simple!

 

By utilising the fly lines at your disposal not only will you be able to catch more trout, you’ll also get the better ones!

 

I hope that you found this article interesting, it’s basic but it really does highlight the MUST-HAVES if you want to do any good while fishing from a drifting boat.
If you want to learn more about fly lines or indeed how to use the ones highlighted here more effectively then please…

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5 ‘MUST – HAVE’ Blobs!

5 ‘MUST – HAVE’ Blobs!

Competition Fly Fishing has seen many fly patterns come and go but one style of fly which has really made an impact (and they seem to only be getting even more of a Worldwide following) are Blobs.

My favourite, not the usual sunburst but an old yellowy one.

Love them or hate them, Blobs are damned effective at harvesting fish from our stillwaters!

This simple fly, no more than Fritz wrapped on a hook has taken the fly fishing world by storm. Rightly so, it’s effectiveness for ‘speed fishing’ is unparalleled, nothing comes close to its fish catching abilities, nothing!

Okay, it can be argued that it’s more effective on the more curious rainbow trout, but Blobs, less in your face ones, will catch brown trout also.

Blobs can be fished fast with a pacey retrieve or indeed slowly, just let the flies fish ‘on the drop’! Either way is going to catch you trout, but you need to ring the changes to see what is most productive on the day!

The pick of the bunch, the MUST-HAVE Blobs!

Here are the top 5 Blobs ( in no particular order ) that you are going to need if you’re looking to compete in most Loch Style Competitions.
1. The Orange Blob, the original and still one of the best
2. The Black Blob, one for when the bright colours seem to scare fish
3. The Tequila Blob, two tone and deadly all the way through the summer
4. The Biscuit Blob, a more washed out affair that will work its magic on pressured fish
5. The Olive Blob, again one that does well when the trout have switched off from gaudier colours, a good choice in Autumn.

Another victim of the lethal Blob comes to the boat, is this the best still water lure of all time? I guided this chap in the photo, he was form Canada, and when I showed him what we’d be using in order to catch, a Sunburst Blob on the top dropper with two buzzers below fished static, I swear he looked at me funny! He had a field day, most fish coming to the Blob!

Best Blob double team combo -in my opinion – Orange on the dropper Black on the point!!!

If you would like any of these Blobs or more information on how to get the most from them, then please..

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I will elaborate more on how to fish with these flies at a later date so stay tuned, it’s not all to coin a phrase,  “YOBS WITH BLOBS, but it’s close…

In the meantime, here’s how to tie one..